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It’s time millennials understood these 7 harsh realities of life so we don’t end up with a generation of gutless adult babies running the show.

7 comments

  • OperationBrandon

    OperationBrandon 4 years, 11 months ago

    So sick of bullshit about millenials. As with any large group of people, don't make assumptions.
    And I also find that the people who write these kind of things mostly seem like crybabies themselves.

    Reply

    • theycallmechad

      theycallmechad 4 years, 11 months ago

      As someone who is counted as a millennial myself, I have to say that I am so sick of of how so many millennials are representing my generation. Nobody said 100% of those in this generation are like those depicted in this article. It speaks of the worst, and possibly majority, of this group. The entitlement mentality is nauseating and will ironically lead to more of the things millennials (again, not ALL millennials) complain about (income gap, political incorrectness, winners vs losers, hurt feelings, etc). They are perpetuating the very problems they are crying (wait, is that term offensive?) so hard for others to fix, without realizing that they themselves are the only people capable of creating the change they so desperately want.

      But thank you for your calm and collected participation. Here's your trophy.

      Reply

      • OperationBrandon

        OperationBrandon 4 years, 11 months ago

        I just think I'm on a totally different side of this argument from everyone else. Since when did caring about other people make you a bad person? Why, after all the work done to promote education of mental health issues, are we now berating people for being upset about real-world issues that affect them?

        Maybe I'm just stuck in my liberal bubble, but it kinda seems like what would help in the world right now is a bit more understanding.

        Reply

        • theycallmechad

          theycallmechad 4 years, 11 months ago

          I think it's fallacious to assume that those "stuck in (the) liberal bubble" are the only ones who care about others. If my kid is crying because I didn't buy them candy, after all, I have two options: give them candy or help them understand why they don't get candy. Just because I fall into the second category doesn't mean I don't care about my child. It's just a different approach. The problem, as you stated, is understanding. The candy-givers refuse to acknowledge my solution to the problem, and shout at me to understand theirs. It must go both ways.

          I get the feeling that your comments are a product of feelings that have arisen following this past week's election. Let me start by saying that I feel your pain. I really do. People assume that since I am a conservative that I am celebrating the results of this election in the streets. I have never been more embarrassed at "my side." It was an absolute punch in my gut, and I currently feel the same despair as I did each time Barry O won. But nobody is going to help me feel better about it. That is my job. Nobody, including yourself, cared about how I felt when Obama won the past two times in a row, and I can promise it hurt equally as much to me as this loss does to you. My college professors still made me take tests, it was expected that I wouldn't burn cities and pull Obama supporters out of their cars to beat the crap out of them, and there were no "safe zones" or support groups for me to run to for help. And do you know what it turned me into? A better person.

          I agree that mental health is an issue. But if I were treated the last two elections like those on the left want to be treated following this election, it would have done more to hurt my mental health than to benefit it and I would have ended up living my life a victim. Don't be happy about the results. Protest them, even, if you need. But it isn't changing. So let's try to come together and scrap back together the best America we can in spite of who is in the White House.

          Reply

          • OperationBrandon

            OperationBrandon 4 years, 11 months ago

            Firstly I'll just get it out there that I'm not American but British - but the results have been felt over here, and especially in the wake of Brexit a lot of people are concerned about their futures.

            Whatever reason you were upset about Obama getting into office, I'm not sure it has affected people as negatively as Trump will. Already racial abuse has spiked (as it did in the UK in the wake of Brexit), and if he's able to enact his plans it will tangibly affect peoples' lives. For example, did Obama threaten to invalidate your marriage, or those of anyone you know? I would genuinely like to know how he would have negatively affected someone, as from here he seemed ineffectual at worse.

            I think people know that no one gives a shit how they feel, and that quite possibly makes it worse. We're in a generation where every time we try to point out inequality, we're told to shut up and whine to social media. So, we do, because what's the other option?

            I don't think only liberals care about others - but it feels like a very targeted point against liberals that their weakness lies in actually thinking about how other people might be affected by these big decisions.

            Hopefully I'm not coming across as rude or bratty. I just have major issues with the whole "crybaby" debate, as it's deliberately set up so that there's no rebuttle and any response can be deemed overly emotional.

            Reply

            • Chet_Manly

              Chet_Manly 4 years, 11 months ago

              Im curious what the rebuttal to the "I'm offended so you need to change" argument we have seen on college campuses here in the US? It seems that that argument is used by both sides...if I'm understanding properly the point you were making.

              I'm going to post an article for you where the author sums up things better than ever could. It deals with how individual freedom (via expression of religion) changed under President Obama. It also expresses the exact sentiments of almost every thoughtful (meaning non-reactionary) conservative or libertarian I know regarding trump and Obama.

              https://stream.org/if-progressives-dont-want-a-trump-win-in-2020-maybe-they-should-stop-attacking-religious-freedom/

              Now, I'm on the cusp of the millennial generation but I was not raised to have the same mentality that I see in my peers and those younger than me. I share your concern for how millennials are portrayed but I can also see how they come across to older generations. Ultimately, we are all indiviuals and unique in our thoughts and what shapes our views. I would like to think any reasonable person would get to know a person first rather than ultimately judging them just by the behaviors of others their age.

              Reply

            • Chet_Manly

              Chet_Manly 4 years, 11 months ago

              Sorry, but I have more to say and my goal is to foster understanding, not to be confrontational. I'm really glad you bring these things up because it's not a common discussion people can have.

              You mention the focus on inequality and that's an excellent point to discuss. When I hear discussion of the problems with inequality from Bernie Sanders and others on the left, I acknowledge that it exists but the arguement seems to focus on fixing the inequality of "outcome". Conservatives/libertarians want to focus to be on fixing inequality of "opportunity"; acknowledging that there will always be inequality in the world, the best thing we can do is to allow everyone the same opportunities under the law and have the government get out of the way to allow people to fail or succeed based on their own work ethic/ability/motivation.

              I believe both sides see inequality as a problem but we talk about the issue from such different perspectives that we don't seem to be able to understand each other.

              Reply